Credit Course Schedules

Physics - Spring 2022

In Person
Classes meet in person on campus; specific days/times/location
Online - Asynchronous
Classes meet fully online; no specific days/times/locations
Online - Synchronous (Zoom)
Classes meet via Zoom or other resource; specific days/times
Hybrid - Online Asynchronous & Online Synchronous (Zoom)
A portion of the classes meet synchronous via Zoom or other resource and a portion is asynchronous online; there will be some specific days/times
Hybrid - Online & In-person
A portion of the classes meet in person on campus and a portion is asynchronous or synchronous online; there will be some specific days/times/locations
Hybrid - Online Asynchronous & In Person
Classes meet in both asynchronous online and in-person modes; specific meeting times and locations for in-person portions of classes are listed with each course
Hybrid - Online Synchronous (Zoom) & In Person
Classes meet in both synchronous online (Zoom) and in-person modes; specific meeting times and locations are listed with each course
Analytical Physics I — 3517
PHY 1710 – 4 credits
Sean R. Nowling

Students will use computer-based laboratory techniques to learn about Newtonian mechanics. They will learn good problem-solving strategies as well as good laboratory practices. They will use vector analysis and calculus to study linear kinematics, dynamics, and conservation laws for momentum and energy. Students will investigate rotating systems and rigid bodies, including solving problems which use angular momentum, torque, center of mass, and moment of inertia concepts. They will also explore simple harmonic oscillators and wave motion. This is the first semester in a three-semester sequence of physics courses designed for students planning to major in physics, chemistry, mathematics, engineering science, or computer science. Students will begin to become aware of physics in everything they do and see. A tutorial session is available and strongly recommended. Prerequisite: ENG 1510, MAT 1710, and high school physics or PHY 1510 or PHY 1610. J spring. Master Course Syllabus

Jamestown Campus
Sheldon Center 133
Jan 19 – May 13 Mon, Wed, Fri 10:00 am – 10:50 am
Analytical Physics I-LAB — 3522
PHY 1710 – 0 credits
Sean R. Nowling

Students will use computer-based laboratory techniques to learn about Newtonian mechanics. They will learn good problem-solving strategies as well as good laboratory practices. They will use vector analysis and calculus to study linear kinematics, dynamics, and conservation laws for momentum and energy. Students will investigate rotating systems and rigid bodies, including solving problems which use angular momentum, torque, center of mass, and moment of inertia concepts. They will also explore simple harmonic oscillators and wave motion. This is the first semester in a three-semester sequence of physics courses designed for students planning to major in physics, chemistry, mathematics, engineering science, or computer science. Students will begin to become aware of physics in everything they do and see. A tutorial session is available and strongly recommended. Prerequisite: ENG 1510, MAT 1710, and high school physics or PHY 1510 or PHY 1610. J spring. Master Course Syllabus

Jamestown Campus
Fees: $20
Sheldon Center 133
Jan 19 – May 13 Mon, Wed, Fri 11:00 am – 11:50 am
Analytical Physics II — 3523
PHY 2710 – 4 credits
Sean R. Nowling

Students continue their investigation into physical phenomenon by focusing on electric and magnetic interactions and the structure of matter. Students will develop an understanding of Maxwell's equations from a detailed treatment of the laws of Coulomb, Ampere, and Faraday. They will use an investigative approach to get an intuitive understanding of electric and magnetic fields and their interactions with charged matter. Students will use vector calculus concepts such as line and surface integrals and will become familiar with the operation of meters and computer based data acquisition devises. Students will also study geometric and physical optics. The course will end with perplexing problems of noncovariance of the electromagnetic theory of Maxwell. The answers to these questions lead to the study of modern physics topics. Prerequisite: PHY 1710; Prerequisite/Corequisite: MAT 2650. J fall. Master Course Syllabus

Jamestown Campus
Sheldon Center 133
Jan 18 – May 13 Tue 1:15 pm – 3:55 pm
Analytical Physics II-LAB — 3524
PHY 2710 – 0 credits
Sean R. Nowling

Students continue their investigation into physical phenomenon by focusing on electric and magnetic interactions and the structure of matter. Students will develop an understanding of Maxwell's equations from a detailed treatment of the laws of Coulomb, Ampere, and Faraday. They will use an investigative approach to get an intuitive understanding of electric and magnetic fields and their interactions with charged matter. Students will use vector calculus concepts such as line and surface integrals and will become familiar with the operation of meters and computer based data acquisition devises. Students will also study geometric and physical optics. The course will end with perplexing problems of noncovariance of the electromagnetic theory of Maxwell. The answers to these questions lead to the study of modern physics topics. Prerequisite: PHY 1710; Prerequisite/Corequisite: MAT 2650. J fall. Master Course Syllabus

Jamestown Campus
Fees: $20
Sheldon Center 133
Jan 20 – May 13 Thu 1:15 pm – 3:55 pm