History

  • HIS 1510 World History Before 1500

    Students will examine the foundations of major cultures of today's world from the beginning of recorded history to the early modern age, with an emphasis on how these developments continue to shape the human experience. They will utilize methods of the social sciences by researching, interpreting, and communicating an understanding of primary and secondary historical sources. The factual and interpretive content of this course will emphasize the comparisons of key historical developments, their chronology, interaction, and the diffusions of the world's major cultures amid increasing global interconnection. Corequisite: ENG 1510; must meet minimum college level reading score 80+. It is not necessary to take HIS 1510 before HIS 1520. HIS courses are reading and writing intensive. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 1520 World History since 1500

    Students in this introductory historical survey course will study and evaluate the cultural changes and continuities of selected world societies during the Modern Era, from the sixteenth century CE, to the present from a western perspective. They will use social sciences methods to research, interpret, and communicate historical understanding through the use of primary and secondary sources. The shaping of the modern age and its legacy for the world today will be stressed, as will the implications for the future of the global community. Corequisite: ENG 1510, must meet minimum college level reading score 80+. It is not necessary to take HIS 1510 before HIS 1520. HIS courses are reading and writing intensive. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 1530 US History before 1865

    Students will be introduced to the history of the United States from the European Encounter through the Civil War. Using the methodology of the social sciences, students will learn and evaluate the major political, social, cultural, scientific-technological, economic, and natural developments that shaped the United States during its formative years; when the American republic was founded, expanded, and tested by division. Students will give special attention to the unique contributions made by diverse peoples and institutions, and the responsibilities of educated citizens today.Corequisite: ENG 1510, must meet minimum college level reading score 80+. It is not necessary to take HIS 1530 before HIS 1540. HIS courses are reading and writing intensive. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 1540 US History Since 1865

    Students will examine the history of the United States from the conclusion of the Civil War to the present. Using the methodology of the social sciences, students will learn and evaluate the major political, social, cultural, scientific-technological, economic, and natural developments that have shaped the recent American experience. Students will give special attention to the unique contributions made by diverse peoples and institutions, and will better understand the responsibilities of educated citizens today. Corequisite: ENG 1510, must meet minimum college level reading score 80+. It is not necessary to take HIS 1530 before HIS 1540. HIS courses are reading and writing intensive. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 2010 History Internship

    Students receive on-the-job experience consisting of 135 hours of supervised activity in a local business or industry. Students work in conjunction with a faculty mentor and a supervisor at the job site. All guidelines in the original college internship policy will be followed. Prerequisite: at least a 2.0 GPA and either sophomore standing or one semester completion in an appropriate certificate program. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 2020 History Internship II

    Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 2100 The American Civil War

    Students will survey the American Civil War and the subsequent Reconstruction Era. The specific topics to be covered include: the causes of the war; the political, economic, military, and diplomatic execution of the war; the problem of waging war in a democracy; the constitutional issues raised by the war; the reasons the South lost the Civil War; the impact of the war and reconstruction on American history; and the reconstruction policies of Lincoln, Johnson, and the Radical Republicans. Lectures will focus on the military aspects of the war. Prerequisite: ENG 1530. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 2560 History of World War II

    Students will examine and evaluate the world at war with emphasis on the role of the United States from the battlefields to the homefront. Multiple factors of the aftermath of World War I, the rise of fascism, Japan's expansion in Asia, the alliance of Britain, America, and the USSR, and the strategies of each side in the war are studied. Implications of the surrender of Germany and Japan, the use of nuclear bombs, and the interests of the U.S. and USSR in creating a new world after the war are assessed. Corequisite: ENG 1530. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 2570 History of World Religions

    This interdisciplinary course examines the development and variety of religious belief in the past and present. Historical, pre-historic, and non-literary traditions are examined, including Native American, African, Asian, Indo-European, and Semitic beliefs. Special consideration is given to religious development, assimilation, diffusion, practices, and phenomena. Cross-cultural comparisons and the key tenets of today's world faiths are also emphasized. Eligibility: ENG 1530. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 2590 Native American History

    Students will examine the prehistory and history of Native North Americans through the present. Culture, religion, intertribal affairs, and Indian-European relations from a Native point of view are studied. The history of the Iroquois, particularly in New York state, is emphasized. Eligibility: ENG 1530. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 2600 Global History through Food

    Students will explore the global past through an analysis of a variety of foods and foodways, focusing on the political, economic, social, and cultural impacts of food and beverages on the world's peoples, their identities, and historical development. Students will discover how the quest for food and food security led to the rise of civilization, fueled imperialism, inspired industrialization, and contributed to globalization. Corequisite: ENG 1530. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 2610 Intro to US Women's History

    Students will explore the diversity of women's experiences within the larger context of United States history from the colonial era to the present. Concepts of gender, power, race/ethnicity, and cultural identity will be considered alongside women's contributions of the political, economic, social, and cultural life of the nation. Special emphasis will be given to the diverse experiences of women of different races, ethnicities, social classes, regions, and ages, as seen through a variety of sources and media. Prerequisite: ENG 1530 (or taking concurrently). Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 7001 Introduction to Big History

    Students will learn how simple ordinary things are connected to larger historical movements occurring across space and time. This course introduces historical themes, concepts, and patterns that help students see the "big picture" of history and better understand people, civilizations, and their place in the universe. Students will participate in a variety of writing activities based on viewing and 'reading' the Big History film series. Prerequisite: Must score 57+ on Accuplacer or have credit for or be co-registered for ENG 0430, ENG 1510 or ENG 1530. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 7510 Chautauqua Region Before 1865

    Students will explore selected topics in the history of the Chautauqua County, New York, and its environs, up to and including the era of the Civil War. Assignments will examine a variety of primary sources, from letters and newspaper articles to images and artifacts. At least one class will be held off-campus at a local site of historical interest. Lectures and readings will ink local experiences to the larger narrative of American history. Eligibility: ENG 1510. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 7511 Chautauqua Region Since 1865

    Students will explore selected topics in the history of the Chautauqua region of southwestern New York State, within the context of American history after 1865. In the process, they will examine a variety of primary sources that are available close at hand, including written sources, photographs, artifacts, and the built environment. Since they were created or used in the past, these primary sources afford a unique opportunity to experience history firsthand. They also reveal the rich history present around us. Corequisite: ENG 1510 or Eligibility: ENG 1530. Campus & Term: Other Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 8016 Race for the White House

    Students will explore American presidential campaigns past and present with an emphasis on understading the political process, historical causation, and function of campaign rhetoric. This inter-disciplinary course will prepare students to be better citizens by equipping them with the political framework, historical context, and message analysis necessary to make informed decisions about the current presidential elections. Students will critically analyze a variety of campaign artifacts and evaluate the political arguments of others in major news organizations (both domestic and international). Eligibility: ENG 1530; Reading 80+. J fall; C fall. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 8502 20th Century US History/Film

    Students will explore the social and cultural trends of 20th century America through this historical analysis of a variety of motion pictures such as The Birth of a Nation, The Grapes of Wrath, Salt of the Earth, and Thelma and Louise. By focusing on the diversity of the American experience through an analysis of film as a primary historical source, students will discover how concepts of power, gender, social class, cultural identify, race/ethnicity emerge, are perceived, contested, and change over time and space. Students will employ historical analysis in reviewing eight films and completing a film treatment on themes of the early 21st century. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 8504 Intro to US Women's History

    Students will explore the American past from the Colonial era to the present, focusing on the social and cultural diversity of the American experience through an analysis of the lives of American women. Students will explore concepts of power, gender, social class, cultural identity, and race/ethnicity as they emerge, are perceived, contested, and change over time and space. Students will analyze a variety of media and complete a final research project. Corequisite: ENG 1530. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 8509 American History through Food

    This course explores the American past through an analysis of a variety of foods and beverages, focusing on the impact of food/beverages on American cultures, identities, and historical developments. Students are required to complete five book reviews, maintain a personal food journal, complete a final research project on a food/beverage history NOT covered in class, and contribute to the final culinary feast. Master Course Syllabus

  • HIS 8511 Turning Points in History

    Students will gain a deeper understanding of how simple ordinary things are connected to larger historical phenomena from the origin of the universe to modern times. This course helps students to better understand human beings, civilizations, and their place in the universe by building upon themes and concepts introduced in other social science courses. Students will participate in oral and written analysis of historical books and documentaries and will complete a final research project. Corequisite: ENG 1530. Master Course Syllabus