Green Features

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Environmentally-Progressive Features of the JCC Science Center:

  • The building's east-west orientation maximizes solar radiation exposure and enhancing energy efficiency.
  • Rain water and snow melt are collected in underground tanks located on the west side of the building, then filtered and pumped into the building for flushing toilets, watering the plants in the 300 square foot greenhouse, and dripirrigation of the vegetative roof garden.
  • Covering roughly one third of the building, our garden roof will provide habitat for wildlife, storm-water erosion control and treatment, thermal insulation and moderation, an outdoor botanical classroom, and a beautiful place for instruction and inspiration.Ceiling of the Science Center, displaying energy efficient windows
  • Sun tunnels (“sun pipes”) located in the hallways in the north and south wings of the building,  bring natural daylight from the rooftops into interior hallways, enhancing natural lighting and reducing electricity use.  The electrical lights in these spaces contain sensors minimizing power use during daylight hours.
  • Educational display cabinets in hallway walls in the north and south corridors, visible from both sides of the walls, allowing light to penetrate the hallways from the outside windows, and displays of specimen, models, and other educational materials for viewing by passers-by.
  • Light shelves  and sun screens, installed on either the inside or the outside of the windows, are used to either diffuse additional natural light into the building without producing additional heat, or limit intense sunlight of summer, enhancing energy efficiency.
  • Windows and doors have Solarban 80 glass, a high-performance, Low-E glass for solar control.
  • Significant outside wall space dedicated to windows allows healthy full-spectrum daylight into the building in all classroom, laboratory, and study areas.
  • Approximately 40% of the project area has been restored to a meadow habitat seeded with native flowers, grasses, shrubs, and trees, restoring valuable wetland ecosystem functions and habitat for wildlife, and providing outdoor laboratories and learning spaces.
  • Eastern and western pergola and canopy systems provide shading with an aesthetic appeal, and native landscaping and plantings for wildlife surround the building.
  • Water-permeable pathways lead from the building to JCC’s College ParkThese porous, gravel pathways reduce storm-water run-off and soil erosion, allow groundwater recharge, and affording faculty, students, and visitors the opportunity to walk from the building to the park to observe native plant species in a natural environment.
  • The white roofing membrane is light reflective to minimize heat buildup and heat island effects in the warm weather months.Real-time digital dashboard panel to keep track of energy usage
  • A demonstration photovoltaic solar array located on the south stair tower and a two-well geothermal well system showcase energy consciousness and conservation and are linked to a real-time digital dashboard panel displaying power consumption and energy savings associated with these carbon footprint-reducing technologies.
  • Motion sensors monitor room occupancy and adjust lighting and energy utilization accordingly.
  • An energy efficient air handling system has beenincorporated into the construction of the building.
  • A bike rack is available for those students, faculty, and visitors who prefer to use bicycles as opposed to motor vehicles.
  • Recycled materials were used in the building and furniture, and  FSC-certified wood was used where possible to promote environmentally-sustainable natural resource consumption. Likewise, a portion of all building materials were required to be purchased from suppliers within a 500-mile radius, promoting regional economies and minimizing fossil fuel use associated with shipping materials.
  • A significant amount of construction waste was diverted from landfills and instead has been recycled.
  • Indoor environmental quality has been assured via use of low-emitting adhesives, sealants, paints, coatings, carpet systems, composite wood, and agrifiber products.